For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 
For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 
For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 7 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 7 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 
For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 7 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 
For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca


 

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 7 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 7 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 
For immediate release

Winnipeg (20 August 2015) By a wide margin, Canadians do not trust the food processing industry to police its own safety practices and expect the federal government to ensure that what we eat is safe, according to a new Nanos poll released this morning.

The survey found 7 in 10 Canadians believe government should be ultimately responsible for food safety, while only 26% think food production companies should be responsible. And, 84% trust government inspectors and scientists to ensure the food we eat is safe, up substantially from 2008 when 64% of Canadians held this view.

Only 14% think the government should rely more on food companies to police their own safety processes while three-quarters (75%) think the federal government should invest more and be more hands-on in policing food safety.

“Canadians just do not trust the food companies when it comes to safety.   They reject the federal government’s retreat from direct oversight of food processors and increasing reliance on industry to police their own safety practices,”  Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union which represents federal food inspectors, said at a news conference in Winnipeg this morning.

The survey found that the vast majority of Canadians oppose planned cuts to food safety budgets. More than half (55%) think the federal government should cancel the cuts and invest more in food safety, while another 28% would cancel the cuts. Six-in-ten (61%) Canadians are concerned about that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has fewer staff today than before the Maple Leaf Foods listeriosis outbreak that killed 22 people in 2008.

“Concerns about the shortage of inspectors are well-founded. Every meat slaughter facility in the province of Manitoba is operating with substantially fewer than the minimum number of meat inspectors required to ensure consumer safety, including the giant Maple Leaf Foods hog slaughter establishment in Brandon,” Kingston said.

Federal meat inspection teams are 30% to 57% below minimum staffing levels in Manitoba slaughter facilities according to a detailed staffing review also released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Manitoba and in most other parts of the country too. Planned cuts to the CFIA’s budget will only open the door wider for companies that want to cut safety corners. Consumers are at risk,” Kingston said.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of downsizing its meat inspection staff and program after the Harper government cut its budget. The Agency plans to eliminate 273 positions as it grapples with a $35 million budget cut.

The staffing review found the shortage in the four major Manitoba slaughter facilities so acute that inspectors working in the province’s meat processing facilities are often “borrowed” to cover glaring inspection gaps in slaughter establishments.

Because inspection teams working in Manitoba’s federally licenced processing and cold storage facilities barely meet minimum staffing levels, Kingston described this practice as “robbing the poor to pay the destitute.”

Even when inspection teams meet required staffing levels, line speeds permitted in slaughter plants are dizzyingly high, making their work to identify food safety problems near impossible.

For example, at maximum production the Maple Leaf slaughter establishment in Brandon can process 18,000 hogs a day. That translates to almost 20 hogs every minute1 when the plant works at capacity during its usual two production shifts.

Line speeds in poultry processing plants are also impossibly fast, exceeding the safe pace set south of the border by the USDA.

“Without action to address the inspection shortage, it is just a matter of time before the next major food borne illness outbreak occurs. Unfortunately, the federal government is cutting rather than fixing the food inspection system,’ Kingston said.

“Food safety could have a bearing at the ballot box. The majority (60%) are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours increasing the number of inspectors versus only 6% are more likely to vote for a candidate who favours allowing food companies to police their own safety practices,” said Chris Aylward, National Executive Vice-President of the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The Agriculture Union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

The opinion survey of 1000 voting age Canadians was conducted by Nanos Research July 18th to 22nd, 2015. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. Results have a margin of accuracy of 3.1% plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

-30-

For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca


 

Manitoba Staffing Review

Meat Inspectors in federally registered slaughter establishments

Establishment #

Owner Type

Inspectors

Minimum required

Typically on the job

% below Minimum Required

126

Hylife Foods      LP

Hog 27 19

30%

007

Maple Leaf Inc.

Hog 29 19

34%

281

Dunn-rite Food Products

(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.)

Poultry 7 3

57%

137

Granny’s Poultry Co-operative

Poultry 7 4

 43%

 

Meat Inspectors in federally registered processing establishments

There are seven meat processing plants in Manitoba, including three that produce high-risk “ready-to-eat” products, and four cold storage facilities that are federally registered establishments. Twelve meat inspectors are normally available to cover these establishments. However, these are not normal times for meat inspection in Manitoba and frequently inspectors from the processing group are “borrowed” to fill gaps in slaughter establishments where long-term vacancies are not being filled and for short-term leave for illness, training or other reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Publication immédiate

Winnipeg (20 août 2015) — Une forte majorité de Canadiens ne font pas confiance à l’industrie de la transformation alimentaire pour superviser ses propres pratiques de salubrité, et s’attendent à ce que le gouvernement fédéral s’assure de la sécurité de ce que nous mangeons, selon un nouveau sondage Nanos publié ce matin.

Le sondage a révélé que 7 Canadiens sur 10 croient que le gouvernement devrait être ultimement responsable de la sécurité des aliments, alors que seulement 26 % considèrent que cette responsabilité devrait être confiée aux compagnies. D’autre part, 84 % font confiance aux inspecteurs et scientifiques gouvernementaux pour assurer la salubrité de ce que nous mangeons, une hausse substancielle par rapport à 2008, quand 64 % des Canadiens partageaient cette opinion.

Seulement 14 % croient que le gouvernement devrait s’appuyer davantage sur les compagnies alimentaires pour superviser leurs propres mécanismes de salubrité, tandis que les trois quarts (75 %) croient que le gouvernement fédéral devrait investir davantage et être plus présent sur le terrain pour assurer la sécurité des aliments.

« Les Canadiens ne font tout simplement pas confiance aux compagnies alimentaires en matière de sécurité. Ils rejettent le désengagement du gouvernement fédéral de la supervision directe des transformateurs alimentaires, et le recours croissant à l’industrie pour contrôler ses propres pratiques de salubrité, » dit Bob Kingston, président du Syndicat Agriculture, qui représente les inspecteurs fédéraux des aliments.

Le sondage a révélé que la grande majorité des Canadiens sont opposés aux compressions prévues dans les budgets de la sécurité des aliments. Plus de la moitié (55 %) croient que le gouvernement fédéral devrait annuler les compressions et investir davantage dans la sécurité des aliments, tandis qu’un autre 28 % annulerait les compressions. Six Canadiens sur dix (61 %) s’inquiètent du fait que l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments a moins de personnel aujourd’hui qu’avant la contamination à la listériose chez les Aliments Maple Leaf qui a tué 22 personnes en 2008.

« Leurs craintes quant à la pénurie d’inspecteurs sont bien fondées. Chaque abattoir au Manitoba fonctionne avec un nombre d’inspecteurs des viandes substanciellement moindre que le minimum requis pour assurer la sécurité des consommateurs, y compris le méga-abattoir de porcs de Maple Leaf à Brandon, » dit Kingston.

Les équipes fédérales d’inspection des viandes sont inférieures par 30 à 57 % au niveau minimum de dotation en personnel dans les abattoirs du Manitoba, selon une étude détaillée aussi publiée ce matin par le syndicat des inspecteurs des viandes.

« Il y a une pénurie critique d’inspecteurs des viandes au Manitoba et dans la plupart des autres régions du pays aussi. Les coupures dans le budget de l’ACIA ne feront qu’ouvrir la porte plus grande aux compagnies qui veulent couper les coins en matière de sécurité. Les consommateurs sont menacés, » dit Kingston.

L’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments (ACIA) est en train de réduire le personnel et les programmes d’inspection de la viande, après les coupures budgétaires imposées par le gouvernement Harper. L’Agence planifie d’éliminer 273 postes, alors qu’elle doit encaisser des compressions budgétaires de 35 millions de dollars (35 M$).

L’étude sur la dotation en personnel a trouvé que la pénurie est tellement grave dans les quatre principaux abattoirs du Manitoba qu’il faut souvent « emprunter » des inspecteurs qui travaillent dans les usines de transformation de la viande pour couvrir des manques flagrants d’inspection dans les abattoirs.

Étant donné que les équipes d’inspection au travail dans les usines de transformation de la viande et les entrepôts frigorifiques à inspection fédérale au Manitoba satisfont à peine aux exigences minimales en personnel, Kingston a décrit cette pratique comme « voler aux pauvres pour payer les indigents. »

Même quand les équipes d’inspection satisfont aux exigences en dotation de personnel, la vitesse permise pour les chaînes dans les abattoirs est étourdissante, ce qui rend quasi impossible le travail d’identifier les problèmes de salubrité.

Par exemple, en production maximale, l’abattoir Maple Leaf à Brandon peut traiter 18 000 porcs par jour. Cela se traduit par 20 porcs à la minute[1] quand l’usine fonctionne à pleine capacité avec deux quarts de production par jour.

Dans les abattoirs de volaille, la vitesse des chaines est aussi démesurément rapide, excédant le rythme sécuritaire établi au sud de la frontière par le département américain de l’Agriculture (USDA).

« Sans une action pour répondre à la pénurie d’inspecteurs, ce n’est qu’une question de temps avant que se produise la prochaine contamination toxique transmise par les aliments. Malheureusement, le gouvernement fédéral sabre dans le système d’inspection plutôt que de le réparer, » constate Kingston.

« L’enjeu de la sécurité des aliments pourrait être reflété dans les résultats des élections. La majorité (60 %) auront davantage tendance à voter pour des candidats en faveur de l’augmentation du nombre des inspecteurs, contre seulement 6 % qui voteraient plus probablement pour des candidats en faveur de laisser les entreprises alimentaires contrôler leurs pratiques de salubrité, » a souligné Chris Aylward, vice-président exécutif national de l’Alliance de la fonction publique du Canada.

Le Syndicat Agriculture demande au gouvernement d’augmenter les ressources d’inspection de la sécurité des aliments et de les déployer là où elles sont requises, sur la ligne de front, pour permettre à l’ACIA de répondre à ses exigences minimales en termes de personnels d’inspection.

Le sondage mené par Nanos Research entre le 18 et le 22 juillet 2015 a interrogé 1000 Canadiens en âge de voter. Les répondants étaient recrutés au hasard par des téléphonistes, puis remplissaient un questionnaire en ligne. Les résultats ont une marge de précision de + ou – 3,1 %, 19 fois sur 20.

-30-

Information : Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

[1] Calculé sur la base de deux quarts de production de huit heures.

Document associé: Notes d’allocution


 

Étude du personnel au Manitoba

Inspecteurs des viandes dans les abattoirs à inspection fédérale

Est.

Propriétaire Type

Inspecteurs

Minimum requis

Habituellementau travail

% sous le minimum requis

126 Hylife Foods LP Porcs

27

19

30 %

007 Maple Leaf Inc. Porcs

29

19

34 %

281 Dunn-rite Food Products(Sunrise Poultry Processors Ltd.) Volaille

7

3

57 %

137 Granny’s Poultry Co-operative Volaille

7

4

 43 %

Inspecteurs des viandes dans les abattoirs à inspection fédérale

Il y a sept usines de transformation de la viande au Manitoba, dont trois qui fabriquent des produits « prêts-à-manger », plus à risque, et quatre entrepôts frigorifiques, qui sont des établissements sous inspection fédérale. Douze inspecteurs des viandes sont normalement disponibles pour couvrir ces établissements. Toutefois, l’inspection des viandes au Manitoba ne connaît pas « une période normale » et fréquemment des inspecteurs du secteur de la transformation sont « empruntés » pour combler des absences dans les abattoirs, où l’on ne remplace pas du personnel en absence prolongée, non plus que des absences à court terme pour des congés de maladie, de formation ou d’autres motifs.