FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.

 

  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.

 

  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto

 

  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

 

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.

 

  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.

 

  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto

 

  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

 

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.
  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.
  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto
  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

 

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.

 

  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.

 

  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto

 

  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

 

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.
  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.
  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto
  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

 

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.
  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.
  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto
  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

[1] CFIA 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report (see press kit for excerpts)

[2] CFIA 2014-14 Report on Plans and Priorities (see press kit for excerpts)

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.

 

  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.

 

  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto

 

  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

 

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.
  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.
  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto
  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

 

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Montreal (20 April 2015) – Every federal meat inspection team in the province of Quebec is working shorthanded today, leaving most meat processing and slaughter establishments in the province operating with fewer meat inspectors than are required to ensure compliance with safety requirements.

This finding emerges from a detailed staffing survey released this morning by the meat inspectors’ union.

“There is a critical shortage of meat inspectors in Quebec and in other parts of the country as well. This means that corners are being cut when it comes to safety. Further cuts to CFIA funding rumoured to be in tomorrow’s budget would come with high risk for consumer safety, ” said Bob Kingston, President of the Agriculture Union that represents federal food inspectors.

Meat inspectors in quebec 3

Through internal sources, the Union checked staffing levels at meat processing and slaughter establishments throughout Quebec, including positions not filled.

The bottom line number of inspectors on the job discounts staff on leave (typically, human resources planners recommend employers plan for a 30% leave factor when deploying staff).

“Essential training has been cancelled or delayed as a result of the staffing crisis,” said Rick Cormier, Second National Executive Vice-President of the Agriculture Union.

Facilities canvassed for the staffing survey include meat processing and slaughter plants where cut, ready-to-eat and prepared meats are produced.  These kind of facilities range from very large businesses like the Montreal-based firm Olymel L.P. which employs more than 10,000 people, to much smaller companies.

“The federal government has lowered its guard since the Maple Leaf Foods outbreak that killed 22 Canadians. I sincerely hope another major outbreak is not required to force the government to protect Canadian consumers,” Kingston said.

CFIA food safety programs are short staffed across the country:

  • Meat inspectors working in meat processing plants throughout Alberta that produce the highest risk ready-to-eat products have been operating 33% below required minimum staffing levels for more than a year.
  • Inspection tasks in meat plants there have been reduced as a result and a two tier system has been introduced that inspects meat destined for dinner tables in Canada to a lower standard than meat produced for export. After Health Minister Rona Ambrose called the Union’s revelation “inaccurate and irresponsible” an internal CFIA document was leaked substantiating the Union announcement.
  • There is only one consumer protection inspector responsible for every restaurant and retail food outlet in the entire city of Toronto
  • Meanwhile, the entire consumer protection unit in British Columbia has been disbanded.

According to CFIA forecasts, the current government plans to cut spending on food safety by 21% by 2016–17. This will translate to staff cuts of 16.5%, or 548 positions.CFIA pic 2

The union is calling on the government to increase food safety inspection resources and place them where they are needed on the frontline to allow the CFIA to meet its minimum inspection staffing requirements.

-30-

 For further information: Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca

[1] CFIA 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report (see press kit for excerpts)

[2] CFIA 2014-14 Report on Plans and Priorities (see press kit for excerpts)

 
POUR PUBLICATION IMMÉDIATE

Montréal (20 avril 2015) — Chaque équipe fédérale d’inspection des viandes au Québec travaille en désavantage numérique aujourd’hui, de sorte que la plupart des abattoirs et usines de transformation de la viande fonctionnent avec moins d’inspecteurs que ce qui serait nécessaire pour assurer la conformité avec les exigences de salubrité.

Cette conclusion ressort d’une étude détaillée de la dotation en personnel publiée aujourd’hui par le syndicat des inspecteurs des viandes.

« On constate une pénurie critique d’inspecteurs des viandes au Québec et dans d’autres régions du pays. Cela signifie que l’on coupe les coins ronds en matière de salubrité. Une rumeur court à l’effet que l’ACIA subira d’autres compressions de ses ressources dans le budget de demain, ce qui fera courir des risques élevés à la sécurité des consommateurs,  » dit Bob Kingston, président du Syndicat Agriculture qui représente les inspecteurs fédéraux des viandes.

CFIA french pic

À partir de sources internes, le syndicat a vérifié les niveaux de dotation en personnel dans les abattoirs et les usines de transformation, y compris les postes non comblés, partout au Québec.

Le nombre résultant d’inspecteurs au travail tient compte du personnel en congé autorisé (typiquement, les planificateurs des ressources humaines recommandent que les employeurs calculent un facteur de 30% d’absence lorsqu’ils déploient leur personnel.)

« Des formations essentielles ont été annulées ou retardé à cause de cette crise de la main d’œuvre » dit Rick Cormier, second vice-président exécutif national du Syndicat Agriculture

Les installations qui ont fait l’objet du récent sondage sur la dotation en personnel comprennent des abattoirs et des usines de transformation où l’on produit des charcuteries, et des viandes préparées et prêtes à manger. Parmi ces installations, on compte de très grandes compagnies comme Olymel L.P., basée à Montréal, qui emploie plus de 10 000 personnes, aussi bien que des entreprises plus petites.

« Le gouvernement fédéral a baissé la garde depuis la contamination chez Maple Leaf Foods, qui a causé la mort de 22 Canadiens. J’espère sincèrement que le gouvernement n’attendra pas qu’une autre contamination le force à protéger les consommateurs canadiens, » déclare Kingston.

Les programmes de salubrité des aliments de l’ACIA sont en pénurie de personnel partout au Canada :

  • Les inspecteurs de la viande en poste dans les usines de transformation dans toute l’Alberta, qui produisent les aliments prêts-à-manger comportant les risques les plus élevés, fonctionnent à 33 % sous le seuil minimum de dotation en personnel depuis plus d’un an.
  • En conséquence, les tâches d’inspection dans les usines albertaines ont été réduites, et on a implanté un système d’inspection à deux niveaux selon lequel les viandes destinées aux consommateurs canadiens répondent à des standards d’inspection moins élevés que celles produites pour l’exportation. Après que la ministre de la Santé Rona Ambrose eût qualifié les révélations du syndicat « d’inexactes et irresponsables », un document interne de l’ACIA a confirmé les allégations du Syndicat.
  • Un seul inspecteur en charge de la protection des consommateurs est responsable de tous les restaurants et de tous les commerces alimentaires de détail pour toute la ville de Toronto.
  • Entretemps, toute l’unité de protection des consommateurs de la Colombie-Britannique a été démantelée.

Selon les projections de l’ACIA, le gouvernement actuel planifie de couper les dépenses en sécurité des aliments de 21 % pour 2016-17. Cela se traduira par des réductions de personnel de 16,5 %, ou de 548 postes.CFIA french pic 2

Le syndicat en appelle au gouvernement pour qu’il augmente les ressources d’inspection de la salubrité des aliments, et qu’il les distribue là où elles sont nécessaires sur la ligne de front pour permettre à l’ACIA de satisfaire aux normes minimales en dotation de personnel.

-30-

1- ACIA — Rapport de performance ministériel 2013-2014 (extraits dans dossier de presse)
2 – ACIA — Rapport sur les plans et les priorités 2014-15 (voir dossier de presse)

Pour information:

Jim Thompson — 613-447-9592 — jim@thompsoncom.ca